MADDTech

Latest & Greatest Technology Tips for Your Online Teaching Spaces

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Blog Building 101: The Social Marketing Academy ~ iTunesU

Today I am listening to a free resource thorugh iTunesU called Blog Building 101. This is WordPress based, but he gives 15 minutes of why businesses are using blogs.

Top reasons to have a blog are to drive traffic to your website, basics and figuring out if you can manage your own blog.

What do you share? Anything…it’s a journal, it’s conversational, it is a conversation starter. You use this blog to “talk” to your clients/customers in a casual way. It also allows these clients to interact in real-time. Yet you can use it as a private space to collaborate with your research, writing and self assess what you really want to share.

What pages do you need? For UAA Staff & Faculty you can focus on a single blog page, but if you have an ePortfolio you can have a Home, ePortfolio, Blog etc., that go along with your content/focus.

Why blog? This depends on your goal and focus. Some people blog to share ideas and content they feel is relevant, think political content. Some blog to capture thoughts on content and ideas, but also to share these ideas with either a specific group, say other faculty or researchers in that area, or a team, like here at AI&e we have a team of Instructional Designers and I like to share information relevant to our profession and work with our clients.

If you are trying to gain credibility in your content area or research field you may want to collaborate and share more openly than if you are using your blog as a place to collect your works to organize at a later time. When you share your content, research etc. it builds credibility according to the Social Media Marketing Academy. But only if you are sharing it where your peers can find it.

You can use a blog as a place to produce pages or chapters of a book, pages or chapters of a dissertation, a chapter you are writing for submission to a publisher etc. You can even use it, set to private, as a journal of ideas.

The thing is, it is up to you how you use it.

That’s the beauty of the blog…it’s in the cloud, it’s flexible and it can be shared in so many ways.

Once you have established your blog, using social media to share it out to your readership is the next logical step, but that is really an additional blog post, which I will create and give to you all next week.

 

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Social Media in Higher Ed

Just exactly what are the benefits of Social Media in Higher Ed?

According to the article The Benefits of Social Media for Higher Education by ZOG at Business2Community.com it is all about the marketing, with just this one blurb about students using Twitter to practice Italian Language skills:

In the Classroom. Social media can revolutionize learning and make it more efficient – as long as it isn’t abused. It offers a wealth of worldwide information that professors can use to complement lessons. An excellent example is shown in the case study: “Twitter in an Italian Class.” An Italian teacher at Montclair State University had her students tweet each other – only in Italian – in and out of the classroom, encouraging native speakers to join as well. 90% of the students reported a boost in confidence and motivation.

 I can think of SO many more ways that faculty can use social media in their classroom and degree programs! Here is my off the top of my head today list:

  • Business students should be in LinkedIn posting completed projects, networking and looking for internship opportunities.
  • Graduate students should be finding academic groups in their degree fields and either joining or signing up for RSS feeds via FacebookTwitter, LinkedIn or Google to keep ahead of the newest trends and research in their field. There are academic groups in every area you can think of!
  • Mendeley.com – Free reference manager and PDF organizer. Look for academic and peer reviewed articles in your academic area. For education majors this is amazing.
  • Merlot.org – Peer reviewed online teaching and learning materials. Really this is also amazing and you can post your own work.
  • Facebook private groups to post video role playing practice for more causal peer review in a place they all know.
  • Twitter and Facebook feeds of organizations in your academic or career areas and/or important journals and magazines.
  • LinkedIn is my new favorite for all RSS news feeds, you can get quick views of whats popular and also search and select specific topics to read about.
  • All upper division topic courses should be requiring students to use discussion boards or WIKI’s to post at least one relevant current topic article for weekly from one of these feeds that is relevant to the course topic. Why? so other students can review it and write a 2-3 sentence review of the article and its relevance, can we say encouraging critical thinking skills and ability to discuss current events?
  • Students can use Google Hangouts, Google Drive and Sites to create group assignments and work that can be shared with faculty for review and grading. Why? Because it works.
  • Faculty can set up pre-set announcements and/or deadline dates to go out to Facebook groups. And use groups for discussion and/or current events posts that get to students in realtime vs. posting in Blackboard only.
  • Faculty can use social media the same way, to set up RSS feeds and like pages and groups to review and share information with students in class.
  • YouTube can be used to view movies and videos of relevance to coursework.
  • Creative Commons and other free resources that offer open use or free source photos and videos that can be used in reports and presentations.
  • Open Source or MOOC courses can be used to review materials like math concepts in an economics course.
  • Classes, Departments and Degree Programs creating Social Learning Communities where students engage in dialogue inside and outside the classroom.
There are so many more ways to use not only Social Media but MOOC’s, Creative Commons, Web 2.0 software and more.
Students are living in technology, they are accessing more research materials online than ever before, and they communicate using Blogs, Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites. Ask them…what are they using and how can you implement ways within their world to communicate your course content?
Be creative…
You can do it….

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An Introductory Guide to Content Curation

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

See on gibbon.co

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An Introductory Guide to Content Curation

See on Scoop.itTechnology Stuff

See on gibbon.co

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Student Designed Infographics: Process & Products

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

Last year my students designed infographics for the first time. I enjoyed the process and the products. It was a fun strategy to teach my students crucial research skills while encouraging them to think creatively about how to visually communicate information.

See on catlintucker.com

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8 Excellent iPad Apps to Create Portfolios ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

“So you want to be able to create and access your digital portfolios on the go. There are apps that allows you to do that and some of don’t cost a dime. There is also the possibility to work on your digital portfolios on Google Drive, in fact EdTech did a great video tutorial on how to use Drive as a portfolio solution in your iPad classroom. Below are some of the good apps you can try on your iPad to create digital portfolios and as always if you know about another good app to add to the list, please share with us in the comment form below. Enjoy”

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

more on ePortfolios

See on www.educatorstechnology.com

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Connected Classroom with Google+ Field Trips on HangOuts

What is Connected Classrooms?

Connected Classrooms is a new program on Google+ that makes it easier for teachers to connect their students with virtual learning opportunities on Google+.
How do I take part in Connected Classrooms?
By joining the Connected Classrooms G+ Community, you will be connected with other
teachers and educational organizations to participate and launch your own virtual field
trips.
What is a Hangout On Air?
Hangouts On Air are live video conferences with up to 10 participant screens that are
broadcasted on Google+, recorded onto YouTube, and are fully embeddable on external websites.
What is a Virtual Field Trip?
Virtual Field Trips use Hangouts On Air to connect classrooms with unique learning
experiences provided by a variety of educational partners on Google+
● Virtual Field Trip Video
● Zoo Atlanta Virtual Field Trip case study

For Connected Classrooms, virtual field trips can mean all kinds of learning experiences
provided via Hangout On Air. They could take the form of a virtual tour of a facility, a
conversation with an expert, a show-and-tell session with museum artifacts or a
collaborative activity with another classroom across the globe.

Connected Classroom from Google+

 

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The internet can harm, but can also be a child’s best tool for learning

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

The internet is not a monster we have created. It is us. Our collective consciousness and, unfortunately, our collective subconscious. We like our privacy. We don’t like others to look at our screens when we do our emailing. We don’t “do” Facebook in public. It is our secretiveness that makes the internet a dangerous place.

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

There has been a lot about children, learning and the internet recently. As a mom of digital native teenagers, this really interests me.

See on www.theguardian.com

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Digital Survival

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

Addressing digital citizenship with the “Digital Citizenship Survival Kit”.  GUEST COLUMN | by Craig Badura It’s a simple little prop I use when teaching Digital Citizenship to our pK-12 Aurora Hus…

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

This is a great way to think about digital citizenship in a real world way.

See on edtechdigest.wordpress.com

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