MADDTech

Latest & Greatest Technology Tips for Your Online Teaching Spaces

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What ExAcTlY is an Online Teaching Space?

image of computer screen with instructor and chalkboardIn a few discussions that I have been a part of lately, including updating the UAA Student Fact Finder Blackboard information, it has come to my attention the definition of “Online Teaching Environment or Space” can be a little vague, or even misunderstood.

So let me clarify it for you as far as UAA Academic Innovations & eLearning is concerned.

All classes in the UAA Class Schedule receive an online course shell in UAA Blackboard. This means traditional, hybrid or online courses all have an online space for faculty and students to use during the course of the semester.

Why is this important to you?

  1. You can create online content that your students can access 24/7
  2. You can engage students in online discussions outside the classroom
  3. You can send announcements and information to students outside a classroom
  4. You can encourage students to collaborate using these tools and publish work to share with their classmates
  5. You can use the Grade Center features to collect, review and submit grades to students online. This thing is really a time management hero!
  6. You can track when students submit assignments and create quizzes and other learning modules that auto-grade.
  7. You can build it and reuse modules in subsequent semesters
  8. You can import publisher test banks and create unique tests & quizzes
  9. You can embed video/audio and other online resources for students to review previous to class
  10. You can create your own video/audio or online media and embed it in your online space

Is 10 enough? There are more really great things you can do using this space! Currently Blackboard is the learning management system at UAA, and students also have Google Apps for Education and other online options to use in their personal learning environments.

Need help with organizing and setting up an online course environment? Give me a shout!

 

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Social Media in Higher Ed

Just exactly what are the benefits of Social Media in Higher Ed?

According to the article The Benefits of Social Media for Higher Education by ZOG at Business2Community.com it is all about the marketing, with just this one blurb about students using Twitter to practice Italian Language skills:

In the Classroom. Social media can revolutionize learning and make it more efficient – as long as it isn’t abused. It offers a wealth of worldwide information that professors can use to complement lessons. An excellent example is shown in the case study: “Twitter in an Italian Class.” An Italian teacher at Montclair State University had her students tweet each other – only in Italian – in and out of the classroom, encouraging native speakers to join as well. 90% of the students reported a boost in confidence and motivation.

 I can think of SO many more ways that faculty can use social media in their classroom and degree programs! Here is my off the top of my head today list:

  • Business students should be in LinkedIn posting completed projects, networking and looking for internship opportunities.
  • Graduate students should be finding academic groups in their degree fields and either joining or signing up for RSS feeds via FacebookTwitter, LinkedIn or Google to keep ahead of the newest trends and research in their field. There are academic groups in every area you can think of!
  • Mendeley.com – Free reference manager and PDF organizer. Look for academic and peer reviewed articles in your academic area. For education majors this is amazing.
  • Merlot.org – Peer reviewed online teaching and learning materials. Really this is also amazing and you can post your own work.
  • Facebook private groups to post video role playing practice for more causal peer review in a place they all know.
  • Twitter and Facebook feeds of organizations in your academic or career areas and/or important journals and magazines.
  • LinkedIn is my new favorite for all RSS news feeds, you can get quick views of whats popular and also search and select specific topics to read about.
  • All upper division topic courses should be requiring students to use discussion boards or WIKI’s to post at least one relevant current topic article for weekly from one of these feeds that is relevant to the course topic. Why? so other students can review it and write a 2-3 sentence review of the article and its relevance, can we say encouraging critical thinking skills and ability to discuss current events?
  • Students can use Google Hangouts, Google Drive and Sites to create group assignments and work that can be shared with faculty for review and grading. Why? Because it works.
  • Faculty can set up pre-set announcements and/or deadline dates to go out to Facebook groups. And use groups for discussion and/or current events posts that get to students in realtime vs. posting in Blackboard only.
  • Faculty can use social media the same way, to set up RSS feeds and like pages and groups to review and share information with students in class.
  • YouTube can be used to view movies and videos of relevance to coursework.
  • Creative Commons and other free resources that offer open use or free source photos and videos that can be used in reports and presentations.
  • Open Source or MOOC courses can be used to review materials like math concepts in an economics course.
  • Classes, Departments and Degree Programs creating Social Learning Communities where students engage in dialogue inside and outside the classroom.
There are so many more ways to use not only Social Media but MOOC’s, Creative Commons, Web 2.0 software and more.
Students are living in technology, they are accessing more research materials online than ever before, and they communicate using Blogs, Facebook, Twitter and other social media sites. Ask them…what are they using and how can you implement ways within their world to communicate your course content?
Be creative…
You can do it….

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Instructional Design Models and Theories – eLearning Industry

Instructional Design Models and Theories – eLearning Industry.

This is a great article. Click the link above to read the whole text. ~ Lara

What follows is not just a simple trip down the history of instructional design, its models and theories. Each of the following 33 instructional design milestones has been chosen not only for its importance in the field of learning, but also for its impact for future generations, research and various related disciplines, such as psychology, sociology, anthropology, demography, and even biology and physiology.

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Brainstorm Content Prezi

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Adding Active Learning Assignments to Blended Learning, or not?

After reading the BlendKit2014 Chapter 4 materials on how to merge active learning, blended course concepts and technology to my courses I felt a bit like this…

I think this will work…I hope this will work…I am confident this will work (I think?)

So I tried several attempts at putting my assignment ideas for a blended course into the direct/indirect/online grid, I found the linear format to be too strict. So I found myself drawn to the following Learning Assessment Cycle Grid.

Learning Assessment Cycle with Blended Learning Activities noted

Learning Assessment Cycle with Blended Learning Activities noted

This cycle is how I already think of learning assessments and planning cycles, and the technologies are built into the online assignments: Blog, Discussion Board and Wiki tools within the LMS system and scorm video tutorials available from the publisher and through our Atomic Learning license. These are using interior technologies for a 100 level introduction to computers course.

When teaching a higher level course with more theory I would use technologies like VoiceThread and Google Apps collaborative tools.

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Student-to-Student Interaction: Boom! Mind Blown!

Sugata Mitra, Educational Researcher

Educational Researcher, School in the Cloud

I met Sugata Mitra at Blackboard World in Las Vegas in July 2013. I had not heard of him. His closing keynote address was a “BOOM! Mind Blown!” moment.

I am not a natural educator in my own mind. I have difficulty with large groups of young people, so I never wanted to “be a teacher” like many of my high school peers, but I have found a niche that my personality and expertise has been a joy: Teaching ADULTS! Prof. Mitra’s experiments (TED TALK HERE) blew my mind. As a parent, as an educator, as a human in this crazy 21st Century technology world we live in.

His findings don’t surprise me, his ability to show people what works, his humor in turning the mirror on our education systems, his straight forward no holds barred sweet accent, that makes everything he says fun, telling us (the world) to look at this and simplify everything you are doing so our kids can learn! Yes mind blown…

Related to my career: Teaching Adults, easy. We are kids with baggage. We (adults) have learned just enough to be scared and afraid of “reformatting” hard drives, of breaking the computer…which keeps us (adults) from wanting to try to move forward and holds us back making it easy, very easy, to just say “I like doing it this way, it’s what I know, why change?”

Bringing this all the way back around to the question: “Is there value in student-to-student and student-to-instructor interaction in all courses regardless of discipline? I holla a resounding YES!

Students always need student-to-instructor interaction, that is instruction and guidance, but student-to-student interaction is vital to learning!

Adult students can ease each others fears, as they have similar fears, they can help each other move past these feelings of inadequacy that 21st Century technology create in them, pairing up adults in group work around the computer is awesome! I like a group better than one on one because the “students” talk to each other, share what they know and stop doing that “What do I do now?” every step thing that happens. Especially teachers, they move to teach mode and teach the parts they get with each other. A much better, deeper, sweeter teaching experience every single time!

Sugata Mitra’s example of Activity Based eLearning can give examples of how to use face-2-face time in a blended course to engage and create student-to-student learning.

Hole in the Wall Website

Sugata Mitra’s Hole in the Wall project has spanned from one computer for children in India, to a global scale.

I feel like saying if you watch this TED Talk and review the Hole in the Wall project and aren’t re-purposed and re-passioned about your teaching, you might want to change professions today…this stuff is THAT good.

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Make Presentations Different

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

With SlideIdea, presentations are no longer a one-man show. SlideIdea gives presenters the tools to engage their audience through their audience’s smart phones, laptops, and tablets. Each SlideIdea presentation is provided a unique URL (i.e, www.sld.im/12345 ). Regardless of the location, an audience can simply input the URL into their internet browser and then immediately follow along with slides, participate in polls, ask questions, or even network.

 

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

downloading to test the interactivity because that is the point!

See on slideidea.com

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2014-NMC Horizon Report- higher education.pdf

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

The NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the NMC and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), an EDUCAUSE Program. This eleventh edition describes annual findings from the NMC Horizon Project, an ongoing research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in education. Six key trends, six significant challenges, and six emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years, giving campus leaders and practitioners a valuable guide for strategic technology planning. The format of the report is new this year, providing these leaders with more in-depth insight into how the trends and challenges are accelerating and impeding the adoption of educational technology, along with their implications for policy, leadership and practice.

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

PDF version for reading.

See on www.nmc.org

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An Introductory Guide to Content Curation

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

See on gibbon.co

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An Introductory Guide to Content Curation

See on Scoop.itTechnology Stuff

See on gibbon.co

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