MADDTech

Latest & Greatest Technology Tips for Your Online Teaching Spaces

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Artist Stages an Unauthorized Performance Inside MoMA Using Augmented Reality

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

Performance-based artist Adam H. Weinert manages to sneak a guerrilla performance into MoMA by way of augmented reality.

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

This disruptive art using augmented reality gives me ideas on student presentations in higher ed…

See on www.complex.com

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Adding Active Learning Assignments to Blended Learning, or not?

After reading the BlendKit2014 Chapter 4 materials on how to merge active learning, blended course concepts and technology to my courses I felt a bit like this…

I think this will work…I hope this will work…I am confident this will work (I think?)

So I tried several attempts at putting my assignment ideas for a blended course into the direct/indirect/online grid, I found the linear format to be too strict. So I found myself drawn to the following Learning Assessment Cycle Grid.

Learning Assessment Cycle with Blended Learning Activities noted

Learning Assessment Cycle with Blended Learning Activities noted

This cycle is how I already think of learning assessments and planning cycles, and the technologies are built into the online assignments: Blog, Discussion Board and Wiki tools within the LMS system and scorm video tutorials available from the publisher and through our Atomic Learning license. These are using interior technologies for a 100 level introduction to computers course.

When teaching a higher level course with more theory I would use technologies like VoiceThread and Google Apps collaborative tools.

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A Curated Journal of the Best Copyright-Free Contents Available Online: The Public Domain Review

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

Online journal dedicated to showcasing the most interesting and unusual out-of-copyright works available on the web

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

This could be a great resource for both educators and students.

See on publicdomainreview.org

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Opening Up Education | The MIT Press

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

“Opening Up Education argues that we must develop not only the technical capability but also the intellectual capacity for transforming tacit pedagogical knowledge into commonly usable and visible knowledge: by providing incentives for faculty to use (and contribute to) open education goods, and by looking beyond institutional boundaries to connect a variety of settings and open source entrepreneurs.”

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

Hmmm. I wish this was an OPEN document and not a $20 purchase.

See on mitpress.mit.edu

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Student-to-Student Interaction: Boom! Mind Blown!

Sugata Mitra, Educational Researcher

Educational Researcher, School in the Cloud

I met Sugata Mitra at Blackboard World in Las Vegas in July 2013. I had not heard of him. His closing keynote address was a “BOOM! Mind Blown!” moment.

I am not a natural educator in my own mind. I have difficulty with large groups of young people, so I never wanted to “be a teacher” like many of my high school peers, but I have found a niche that my personality and expertise has been a joy: Teaching ADULTS! Prof. Mitra’s experiments (TED TALK HERE) blew my mind. As a parent, as an educator, as a human in this crazy 21st Century technology world we live in.

His findings don’t surprise me, his ability to show people what works, his humor in turning the mirror on our education systems, his straight forward no holds barred sweet accent, that makes everything he says fun, telling us (the world) to look at this and simplify everything you are doing so our kids can learn! Yes mind blown…

Related to my career: Teaching Adults, easy. We are kids with baggage. We (adults) have learned just enough to be scared and afraid of “reformatting” hard drives, of breaking the computer…which keeps us (adults) from wanting to try to move forward and holds us back making it easy, very easy, to just say “I like doing it this way, it’s what I know, why change?”

Bringing this all the way back around to the question: “Is there value in student-to-student and student-to-instructor interaction in all courses regardless of discipline? I holla a resounding YES!

Students always need student-to-instructor interaction, that is instruction and guidance, but student-to-student interaction is vital to learning!

Adult students can ease each others fears, as they have similar fears, they can help each other move past these feelings of inadequacy that 21st Century technology create in them, pairing up adults in group work around the computer is awesome! I like a group better than one on one because the “students” talk to each other, share what they know and stop doing that “What do I do now?” every step thing that happens. Especially teachers, they move to teach mode and teach the parts they get with each other. A much better, deeper, sweeter teaching experience every single time!

Sugata Mitra’s example of Activity Based eLearning can give examples of how to use face-2-face time in a blended course to engage and create student-to-student learning.

Hole in the Wall Website

Sugata Mitra’s Hole in the Wall project has spanned from one computer for children in India, to a global scale.

I feel like saying if you watch this TED Talk and review the Hole in the Wall project and aren’t re-purposed and re-passioned about your teaching, you might want to change professions today…this stuff is THAT good.

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Geographic Calibrations

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

“Occasionally we need to be reminded that the concepts of distance and area are important to the day-to-day understanding of breaking news stories, as well as many of our daily personal decisions. Although modern communications and transportation have reduced the roles of distance and area in some activities, by no means has it eliminated the utility of these concepts.”

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

As an Alaskan – this bottom graphic makes me happy happy happy!

See on newswatch.nationalgeographic.com

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BlendKit 2014 Week One ~ Response

At my institution blended classrooms are referred to as hybrid. I appreciate the list of “Questions to Ponder” (copied and linked below) and will use this blog post to write out my thoughts on each, reflecting on the faculty and departments I work with daily:

  • Is it most helpful to think of blended learning as an online enhancement to a face-to-face learning environment, a face-to-face enhancement to an online learning environment, or as something else entirely?
    • This can be very confusing. Many long standing faculty split “online and face 2 face” courses by if they use Blackboard or not, meaning there are still many (up to 50%) of faculty that have no online component to their courses at all. Which seems strange to those of us who virtually “live” in the information cloud. Yet to the faculty they see a very clear cut line in the sand (snow here, as it is Alaska) I believe that a course without an online component is a disservice to the student. Content available 24/7 allows students so much more interaction and additional learning moments than the traditional model. Below is a graphic I created to visually describe this concept to College of Business & Public Policy faculty last fall.
    • Traditional Student Model vs. 21st Century Student

      Traditional Student Model vs. 21st Century Student

  • In what ways can blended learning courses be considered the “best of both worlds” (i.e., face-to-face and online)? What could make blended learning the “worst of both worlds?”
    • As noted above I believe blended/online components are completely necessary for 21st century classrooms. Though the issues of digital immigrants does exist. There is a chasm of students currently in college campus’ especially here where many of our students are considered commuter students, non-traditional and are not necessarily digital natives. Technology especially the dreaded “login” page can really be a obstacle to some learners.
  • As you consider designing a blended learning course, what course components are you open to implementing differently than you have in the past? How will you decide which components will occur online and which will take place face-to-face? How will you manage the relationship between these two modalities?
    • I am working on this now, I see creating a learner assessment survey that includes technology knowledge to create a hybrid course model where some students need more face 2 face interaction to learn basic skills and more prepared students can complete online assignments and assessments that evaluate their learning with less face 2 face time.
  • How often will you meet with students face-to-face? How many hours per week will students be engaged online, and how many hours per week will students meet face-to-face? Is the amount of student time commitment consistent with the total time commitment of comparable courses taught in other modalities (e.g., face-to-face)?
    • I still have a regular 2x week course schedule, but will practice some hybrid schedules within that model and survey student success and learning.

Faculty that I work with are very visual and need data and examples so using my fall CIS A105 Intro to Computers course as an example will help me “show” ideas and opportunities that will hopefully open their eyes to new opportunities in eLearning on our campus.

 

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Blended Learning: 10 Trends

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

There is mounting evidence that complementing or replacing lectures with student-centric, technology-enabled active learning strategies and learning guidance—rather than memorization and repetition—improves learning, supports knowledge retention, and raises achievement. These new student-centered blended learning methods inspire engagement, and are a way to connect with every student right where they are while supporting progress toward grade level standards.

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

This blended/hybrid & flipped classroom movement intrigues me. Add badging and we will have the trifecta of all elearning.

See on www.dreambox.com

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FERPA Statements – Pedagogical Repository

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

FERPA Online Examples of how to approach and be cautious.

See on topr.online.ucf.edu

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BlendKit Course: BlendKit Reader: Chapter 3 | Blended Learning Toolkit

See on Scoop.itPedagogy & Higher Education

Lara N. Madden‘s insight:

I find that a selection of assessments works best in any course, online or blended. In a universally designed course an instructor should make diligent attempt to use multiple assessment styles to enhance the learning and ability to have all students with multiple learning styles to be successful. 

See on blended.online.ucf.edu

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